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The interpersonal relationships of the gifted child

Written by Bernardo, Carla Alexandra Albano 
Thursday, 08 April 2010 10:44
The growing sensitivity and interest in the problem of giftedness and gifted students are justified by the advances and the greater social diffusion of the themes of psychology and education. For example, human diversity and differentiation is more easily accepted, as well as the right to co-existence and respect for that same difference and individuality. (Winner, 1996). It makes sense, within the scope of a socio-educational policy of equal opportunities, that the school – now called an inclusive school – is concerned with its most capable students and that it can expect them to excel in their learning and academic performance. On the other hand, the problem gains greater visibility if we take into account that, despite high skills and high performances in certain cognitive areas, several of these gifted students go unnoticed in the education system or even appear identified only when they show particular difficulties in behavior and development. Very naturally, giftedness must be framed in the current school integration policies, more specifically in the midst of “special educational needs”, and as such it can appeal to different forms of action. All education must have as its fundamental objective the promotion of excellence and the maximum development of human potential in all areas of achievement, taking into account the characteristics and needs of each student in particular. We cannot, then, consider the education of the gifted as a matter of elitism or segregation, as it would be so unfair to treat those who are equal differently, how to treat those who are different equally (Tourón & Reyero, 2000). The study of giftedness, specifically in our country, has been the subject of growing interest and effort on the part of the scientific community. Even so, in Portugal there is a relative inertia in the changes made in the field of the education of the gifted, although there is a political interest and effort in specifying guidelines or guidelines in this matter. The case of precocious psychological development, and the possibility of early school entry, illustrates an area in which educational legislation presents, in our country, some differentiated educational attention to gifted students. has been the subject of growing interest and effort on the part of the scientific community. Even so, in Portugal there is a relative inertia in the changes made in the field of education of the gifted, although there is a political interest and effort in specifying guidelines or guidelines in this matter. The case of precocious psychological development, and the possibility of early school entry, illustrates an area in which educational legislation presents, in our country, some differentiated educational attention to gifted students. has been the subject of growing interest and effort on the part of the scientific community. Even so, in Portugal there is a relative inertia in the changes made in the field of education of the gifted, although there is a political interest and effort in specifying guidelines or guidelines in this matter. The case of precocious psychological development, and the possibility of early school entry, illustrates an area in which educational legislation presents, in our country, some differentiated educational attention to gifted students. although there is a glimpse of political interest and effort in specifying guidelines or guidelines in this area. The case of precocious psychological development, and the possibility of early school entry, illustrates an area in which educational legislation presents, in our country, some differentiated educational attention to gifted students. although there is a glimpse of political interest and effort in specifying guidelines or guidelines in this area. The case of precocious psychological development, and the possibility of early school entry, illustrates an area in which educational legislation presents, in our country, some differentiated educational attention to gifted students.

Available at: http://purl.net/esepf/handle/10000/68

Download PDF: http://repositorio.esepf.pt/bitstream/handle/10000/68/PG-EE-2008CarlaBernardo.pdf

Giftedness: A Reality / A Challenge

Written by Helena Serra Fernandes et al 
Thursday, 08 April 2010 10:33
Over time, the concept of giftedness has evolved from definitions that confine giftedness to cognitive skills (IQ), to broader definitions that include multiple areas of human activity and ability. One of the most respected theories today comes from the American researcher Joseph Renzulli. His concept is based on the integration of three rings that he calls “The three ring conception of giftedness” where he affirms that the bearers of high abilities have a constant set of characteristics that remain stable throughout their lives: ability above medium, high creativity and a great involvement with the tasks.

Available at: http://purl.net/esepf/handle/10000/90

Download PDF: http://repositorio.esepf.pt/bitstream/handle/10000/90/Cad_1Sobredotacao.pdf

From identification to educational responses for gifted students

Written by Miranda, Lúcia do Rosário Cerqueira de 
Tuesday, 09 March 2010 12:32
Among the educational measures for students with gifted characteristics are enrichment programs. Since these programs can take place outside the school space, Renzulli (1977; Renzulli & Reis, 1985) proposes that one of the ways in which schools serve these students is to implement the same programs in school times and spaces. According to these authors, enrichment programs should be viewed in a sequence of greater demand and selection of students in order to avoid false positives and false negatives when identifying and referring these students to successive levels of activity complexity. Thus, at a first level, the program can be generalized to the entire student population in order to discover interests and motivations for certain topics. A second level may address 15 to 20% of the most capable students, in order to work with them on cognitive processes and problem solving methods. Finally, a third level of the program serves between 3 and 5% of students, bringing us closer to the rate of gifted students considered internationally. With this theoretical framework, we have advanced in the design of the Odisseia program for students in the 2nd Cycle of Basic Education. A first level (Odyssey 5 / I) (n = 135) was applied to all students who, at the time, attended the school in question and the program provided students with contact with various themes and subjects in order to stimulate and motivate students for the next stages of the program. In the second phase of this program, a subsample of these students was taken (n = 68) considering here the scoring criteria in the 75th percentile in the tests of creativity, aptitude and motivation, or, still, the evaluation of school performance by teachers and the motivation of the students themselves. The Odisseia 6 / II program promoted skills for solving creative problems, developing research studies and interpersonal relationships, so that in a next phase, those with high capacity, creativity and motivation could participate in the Odisseia 6 / III Program (n = 9). This last level was structured on the basis of the development of research projects in the area of ​​interest of each student. The program evaluation considered cognitive variables (creativity and aptitude), motivational variables (academic goals) and school performance, comparing students with and without a program, and within students with a program, the degree of depth resulting from the level of the program in which they participated. At the same time, the perceptions of the School’s teachers and directors were considered. The results obtained seem to contrast the information collected by the qualitative methods compared to the quantitative ones, with signs of clear use by the students, teachers and principals, although not always reflected in changes in the students’ performance in the formal tests used in the assessment. Even so, the analyzes pointed to gains of students in terms of abstract reasoning, fluency and verbal elaboration, fluency, elaboration and figurative originality, and, still, despite the results not assuming statistically significant values, in the learning goals and school performance compared to the students in the comparison group. Due to the involvement achieved by teachers and school directors, as well as the easy adhesion of students to the proposed activities of the program, the Odisseia school enrichment program will justify the appearance of other programs with similar characteristics and objectives to serve the most capable students in school context, ensuring equal educational opportunities within a school that is intended to be inclusive.

Source: Doctoral Thesis in Psychology – Branch of Knowledge in Educational Psychology,  http://hdl.handle.net/1822/8943

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Updated on Tuesday, 09 March 2010 12:42